September 13, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Algae and bacteria in sea ice are important for the carbon budgets of frozen oceans

Underneath the pristine snow cover of the Arctic and Antarctic pack ice, there is a community of microscopic algae and bacteria that thrive within the ice itself. These ice-organisms are adapted to growing on the ice surfaces and within a labyrinth of … Continue reading

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August 12, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Novel worm community affects methane release in ocean

Scientists have discovered a super-charged methane seep in the ocean off New Zealand that has created its own unique food web, resulting in much more methane escaping from the ocean floor into the water column. It will not make it into the atmosphere, … Continue reading

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July 22, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Move like an octopus: Underwater propulsion from a 3-D printer

Octopods, which are also known as octopuses or squid, generally move along the ocean floor with their eight arms, they flee by swimming head-first, in line with the principles of propulsion. When the mollusk does this, water is taken into its mantle, w… Continue reading

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May 30, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Water-rock reaction may provide enough hydrogen ‘food’ to sustain life in ocean’s crust or on Mars

A chemical reaction between iron-containing minerals and water may produce enough hydrogen “food” to sustain microbial communities living in pores and cracks within the enormous volume of rock below the ocean floor and parts of the continents, accordin… Continue reading

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March 27, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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How microbes survive at bare minimum: Archaea eat protein

Beneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers. Continue reading

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March 27, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Whale songs discovered in seismic recordings

When recording seismic activity on the ocean floor, researchers unwittingly recorded whale songs, creating decades worth of data on songs for science. Continue reading

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March 25, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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A marine animal to feed your eco-car

The marine animal tunicate can be used both as biofuel and fish food, according to new research. On the ocean floor, under the pier, and on ship ropes – that’s where the tunicates live. Tunicates are marine filter feeders that serve as bacteria eaters and as a foodstuff in Korea and Japan. But in the future they may become more prevalent. Researchers have found that a certain type of tunicate – ascidiacea – can be used as a renewable source of biofuel and fish food. Continue reading

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March 18, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Antarctica’s first whale skeleton found with nine new deep-sea species

Marine biologists have, for the first time, found a whale skeleton on the ocean floor near Antarctica, giving new insights into life in the sea depths. The discovery was made almost a mile below the surface in an undersea crater and includes the find o… Continue reading

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February 6, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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How new corals species form in the ocean

Biological sciences professors have investigated how corals specialize to particular environments in the ocean. They propose that the large dispersal potential of coral larvae in open water and the proximity of different species on the ocean floor crea… Continue reading

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June 13, 2011
by David Newman
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A Sea- and Sex-Change: The Story of Black Sea Bass in the South Atlantic

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York Here’s something you don’t hear about every day: a fish that catches itself.  Well, sort of.  The black sea bass lives in reefs, wrecks, and hard-bottom habitats of the Atlantic, whe… Continue reading

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September 21, 2010
by Peter Lehner
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Our New Book on Why the BP Blowout Occurred and What We Can Learn from It

Over the weekend, crews finally succeeded in plugging BP’s blown-out oil well once and for all. Workers pumped mud and cement through the newly secured relief well and finally sealed this disastrous wound in the ocean floor for good. 
As we … Continue reading

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