February 19, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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People tend to blame fate when faced with a hard decision

We tend to deal with difficult decisions by shifting responsibility for the decision to fate, according to new research. Life is full of decisions. Some, like what to eat for breakfast, are relatively easy. Others, like whether to move cities for a new… Continue reading

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December 26, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Fate of eels

The European eel is one of the world’s many critically endangered species. Comprehensive protection is difficult because many details of the eel’s complex life cycle remain unknown. In a multidisciplinary study, biologists and oceanographers recently d… Continue reading

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September 13, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Fate of new genes cannot be predicted

New versions of genes, called alleles, can appear by mutation in populations. Even when these new alleles turn the individuals carrying them more fit to survive and reproduce, the most likely outcome is that they will get lost from the populations. The… Continue reading

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August 27, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Kentucky’s first gray wolf in 150 years shot by hunter

After being eradicated in the the mid-1800s, the first wolf to reenter the state shared an all-too familiar fate. Continue reading

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July 15, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Phytoplankton social mixers: Tiny ocean plants use turbulence for travel to social gatherings

Scientists have shown that the motility of phytoplankton also helps them determine their fate in ocean turbulence. Continue reading

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July 9, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Scientists image vast subglacial water system underpinning West Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier

In a development that will help predict sea level rise, scientists have used an innovation in radar analysis to accurately image the vast subglacial water system under West Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier, detecting a swamp-like canal system several time… Continue reading

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July 1, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Shut down of cell survival process found to influence fate of lung cancer tumors

New research suggests that inactivation of an essential gene responsible for the cell survival process known as autophagy can suppress the growth of non-small-cell lung cancer tumors and render them more benign. The findings suggest a possible role for… Continue reading

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June 19, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Fate of the heart: Researchers track cellular events leading to cardiac regeneration

Scientists have visually monitored the dynamic cellular events that take place when cardiac regeneration occurs in zebrafish after cardiac ventricular injury. Their findings provide evidence that various cell lines in the heart are more plastic, or cap… Continue reading

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May 23, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Biophysicists measure mechanism that determines fate of living cells

For the first time, biophysicists have measured the molecular force required to mechanically transmit function-regulating signals within a cell. A new laboratory method, named the tension gauge tether approach, has made it possible to detect and measur… Continue reading

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April 30, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Zebrafish study suggests that vitamin B2 (riboflavin) is an antidote to cyanide poisoning

With the remains of a recent lottery winner having been exhumed for foul play related to cyanide poisoning, future winners might wonder how they can avoid the same fate. A new report involving zebrafish suggests that riboflavin may mitigate cyanide’s t… Continue reading

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April 23, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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The biology of fats in the body

Researchers are studying triglycerides, cholesterol and other fats to learn more about normal and abnormal biology. Chew on these findings the next time you ponder the fate of the fat in a French fry. Continue reading

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March 7, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Tracking sediments’ fate in largest-ever dam removal

Any day now, the world’s largest dam-removal project will release a century’s worth of sediment. For marine geologists, it’s a unique opportunity to study natural and engineered river systems. Continue reading

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February 13, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Epigenetics shapes fate of brain vs. brawn castes in carpenter ants

Researchers found that epigenetic regulation is key to distinguishing one caste of carpenter ants, the “majors”, as brawny Amazons of the colony, compared to the “minors”, their smaller, brainier sisters. The two castes have the same genes, but… Continue reading

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January 31, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Aztec conquest altered genetics among early Mexico inhabitants, new DNA study shows

For centuries, the fate of the original Otomi inhabitants of Xaltocan, the capital of a pre-Aztec Mexican city-state, has remained unknown. Researchers have long wondered whether they assimilated with the Aztecs or abandoned the town altogether. Accord… Continue reading

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January 20, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Mature T cells can switch function to better tackle infection

Helper cells of the immune system can switch to become killer cells in the gut. The fate of mature T lymphocytes might be a lot more flexible than previously thought. New research shows for the first time that mature CD4+ helper T lymphocytes can be re… Continue reading

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January 3, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Sorting stem cells: Scientists propose a new way to isolate early stage embryonic stem cells

When an embryonic stem cell is in the first stage of its development it has the potential to grow into any type of cell in the body, a state scientists call undifferentiated. Using an electric field to pull stem cells through a fluid, a team of researc… Continue reading

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December 27, 2012
by MoreRecycling
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New insight into cell development and cancer

New research has shed new light on how epigenetic signals may function together to determine the ultimate fate of a stem cell. The study implicates a unique class of proteins called polycomb-like proteins as bridging molecules between the “on” and “off… Continue reading

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December 10, 2012
by Reduce
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Internet use can reduce fatalistic view of cancer

Many Americans have fatalistic views on cancer prevention — they believe that getting cancer is a matter of luck or fate. Recent research found that people who use the internet to inquire about their health are more likely to have a positive outlook o… Continue reading

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November 28, 2011
by Jake Schmidt
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What must global warming negotiations in South Africa accomplish (Part 3)?

Jake Schmidt, International Climate Policy Director, Washington, DC
One year ago, countries rallied around the Cancun Agreements with multiple standing ovations and strong words of support.  While these agreements are not sufficien… Continue reading

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May 24, 2011
by Reduce
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Gulf Oil Spill Waste Used in Chevy Volt

What happens to all the plastic absorbent booms used to soak up oil from last year’s spill in the Gulf of Mexico? Their usual fate is to end up in the landfill or be burned to produce energy. General Motors and its partners are taking a different…
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