March 11, 2014
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Plaques detected in brain scans forecast cognitive impairment

Brain imaging using radioactive dye can detect early evidence of Alzheimer’s disease that may predict future cognitive decline among adults with mild or no cognitive impairment, according to a 36-month follow-up study. Alzheimer’s disease — which curr… Continue reading

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March 7, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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Inherited Alzheimer’s damage greater decades before symptoms appear

The progression of Alzheimer’s may slow once symptoms appear and do significant damage, according to a study investigating an inherited form of the disease. Through an international study, researchers have found rapid neuronal damage begins 10 to 20 ye… Continue reading

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March 6, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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Warmer temperatures push malaria to higher elevations

Researchers have debated for more than two decades the likely impacts, if any, of global warming on the worldwide incidence of malaria, a mosquito-borne disease that infects more than 300 million people each year. Now, ecologists are reporting the firs… Continue reading

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February 25, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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Use of acetaminophen during pregnancy linked to ADHD in children, researchers say

Taking acetaminophen during pregnancy has been shown to be associated with a higher risk in children of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Hyperkinetic Disorders, new research indicates. Acetaminophen, found in over-the-counter products such … Continue reading

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February 20, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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A new laser for a faster Internet

A new laser holds the potential to increase by orders of magnitude the rate of data transmission in the optical-fiber network — the backbone of the Internet. Light is capable of carrying vast amounts of information—approximately 10,000 times more bandwidth than microwaves, the earlier carrier of long-distance communications. But to utilize this potential, the laser light needs to be as spectrally pure — as close to a single frequency — as possible. The purer the tone, the more information it can carry, and for decades researchers have been trying to develop a laser that comes as close as possible to emitting just one frequency. Continue reading

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February 11, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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I smoke, but I’m not a smoker: Why some ‘non-identifying smokers’ face risks while denying behavior

While smoking among California adults has dramatically declined in recent decades, researchers report there is a surprisingly large number of people who say they use cigarettes, but don’t consider themselves to be “smokers.” Continue reading

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February 5, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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Uncovering the drivers of honey bee colony declines and losses

Scientists have announced the results of research conducted on honey bee colony declines and the factors attributed to honey bee losses. The work shows that socioeconomic and political pressures on honey production over the past few decades has caused … Continue reading

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January 27, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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New method rescues DNA from contaminated Neandertal bones

Retrieval of ancient DNA molecules is usually performed with special precautions to prevent DNA from researchers or the environment to get mixed in with the DNA from the fossil. However, many ancient fossils have been lying in museum collection for dec… Continue reading

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January 22, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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Galaxies on FIRE: Star feedback results in less massive galaxies

For decades, astrophysicists have encountered a contradiction: although many galactic-wind models — simulations of how matter is distributed in our universe — predict that most matter exists in stars at the center of galaxies, in actuality these star… Continue reading

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January 21, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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Constructed wetlands save frogs, birds threatened with extinction

Over the last few decades, several thousands of wetlands have been constructed in Sweden in agricultural landscapes. The primary reason is that the wetlands prevent a surfeit of nutrients from reaching our oceans and lakes. A study shows, in addition, that wetlands have contributed to saving several frog and bird species from the “Red List” -– a list that shows which species are at risk of dying out in Sweden. Continue reading

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January 15, 2014
by MoreRecycling
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New analysis shows fewer years of life lost to cancer

A new statistical approach to measuring the cancer burden in the United States reveals decades of progress in fighting cancer, progress previously masked by the falling death rates of other diseases. Continue reading

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December 30, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Toward molecular explanation for schizophrenia

Schizophrenia was only recognized as a medical condition in the past few decades, and its exact causes remain unclear. Now a researcher has discovered that an important cell-maintenance process called autophagy is reduced in the brains of schizophrenic… Continue reading

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September 26, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Wildlife face ‘Armageddon’ as forests shrink

Species living in rainforest fragments could be far more likely to disappear than was previously thought, says an international team of scientists. In a study spanning two decades, the researchers witnessed the near-complete extinction of native small … Continue reading

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September 25, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Deep sea ecosystem may take decades to recover from Deepwater Horizon spill

The deep-sea soft-sediment ecosystem in the immediate area of the 2010′s Deepwater Horizon well head blowout and subsequent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico will likely take decades to recover from the spill’s impacts, according to a new scientific arti… Continue reading

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September 24, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Woman finds relief from pelvic pain after nearly two decades

Anne Mosley developed intense pelvic pain while she was pregnant with her youngest child 17 years ago. The pain was caused by a grape-sized pocket of fluid on her urethra, which became infected. Continue reading

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September 23, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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First look at complete sorghum genome may usher in new uses for food and fuel

Although sorghum lines underwent adaptation to be grown in temperate climates decades ago, a researcher said he and his team have completed the first comprehensive genomic analysis of the molecular changes behind that adaptation. Continue reading

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September 18, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Contaminants may cause birds to sing a different tune

In some environments songbirds exhibit inconsistency in their songs which may be caused by non-lethal levels of contaminants that persist in the sediments of the Hudson River region. Biologists studied songbirds that nest along the Hudson River valley,… Continue reading

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September 16, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Extremely potent, improved derivatives of successful anticancer drug created

Scientists have found a way to make dramatic improvements to the cancer cell-killing power of vinblastine, one of the most successful chemotherapy drugs of the past few decades. The team’s modified versions of vinblastine showed 10 to 200 times greater… Continue reading

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September 13, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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New technique in RNA interference cuts time and cost in genetic screens

There is a new contender in the field of gene discovery, and it’s giving knockout mice a run for their money. Researchers have shown that a new technique using RNA interference is able to find genes that cause epidermal tumor growth in months rather th… Continue reading

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September 12, 2013
by MoreRecycling
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Decades on, bacterium’s discovery feted as paragon of basic science

Over time, the esoteric and sometimes downright strange quests of science have proven easy targets for politicians and others looking for perceived examples of waste in government — and a cheap headline. Continue reading

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