July 19, 2012
by David Newman
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Undermining Fisheries Science, Claiming the Opposite

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York
Imagine if your state legislature passed a law, called the “Academic Performance Improvement Act,” that exempted students from having to meet reading standards because they had… Continue reading

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May 10, 2012
by David Newman
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Protections Removed for Imperiled Deepwater Fish Species

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York
   
The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) rescinded vital protections today for two severely depleted deepwater fish species in the South Atlantic, speckled hind and… Continue reading

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May 7, 2012
by David Newman
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Whole Foods Stops Selling Unsustainable Seafood

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York
Whole Foods recently became the first major North American retailer to stop selling unsustainable, or red-listed, seafood.  The red listing, as determined by the Monterey Bay Aquarium… Continue reading

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March 21, 2012
by David Newman
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One Law is Saving Fish Species from Collapse – We Must Keep it Alive

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York
For the first time in a generation, fish populations are getting healthier – science-based management and rebuilding requirements have led to the recovery of 23 fish species since 20… Continue reading

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January 13, 2012
by David Newman
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America’s World-Best Fishing Model Must Not Be Destroyed

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York
The ocean waters under America’s jurisdiction are larger than any other nation. From the Coast of Maine to the Mariana Islands in the Pacific, U.S. marine waters are 23 percent great… Continue reading

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December 15, 2011
by David Newman
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Summer Flounder’s Recovery: A Cautionary Tale

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York

There’s good news to report: a recent scientific assessment has confirmed that summer flounder, or fluke as it’s more commonly known, has been restored to a healthy population… Continue reading

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November 11, 2011
by David Newman
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Why Are We Killing Coral Reefs?

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York

Coral reefs are likely to become the first ecosystem completely destroyed by humans, predicts Dr. Peter Sale, a leading United Nations ecologist.  His new book, Our Dying Planet, exp… Continue reading

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August 17, 2011
by David Newman
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Setting the Record Straight on Bluefin Tuna

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York Last week, I received a comment on a recent blog accusing me of posting a “factually flawed” and “extremely misleading” report of a new study by the International Union for the Con… Continue reading

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August 11, 2011
by David Newman
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News from the Deep

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York Welcome to the first “News from the Deep,” brought to you by NRDC’s Oceans Team. 
It’s telling of humanity’s insatiable appetite that, even in the Galapagos Islands &nd… Continue reading

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August 3, 2011
by David Newman
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Leaving Vulnerable Fish to Fend for Themselves

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York What if, after a string of overloaded passenger elevator failures, a new law was passed requiring stricter weight limits and regulators responded by exempting elevators from all safety requirements, inclu… Continue reading

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July 6, 2011
by David Newman
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Protecting the Giant Groupers of the Deep

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York When it comes to the ocean’s biggest animals, you probably think of whales, or perhaps fast and flashy fish like blue marlin.  Well, let me introduce you to the giant groupers.  These are … Continue reading

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June 28, 2011
by David Newman
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Bill Would Gut Nation’s Fisheries Law

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York In 2006, after years of chronic overfishing (see my recent blog on the history of overfishing in the South Atlantic), Congress amended the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) to… Continue reading

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June 28, 2011
by David Newman
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Bill Would Gut Nation’s Fisheries Law

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York In 2006, after years of chronic overfishing (see my recent blog on the history of overfishing in the South Atlantic), Congress amended the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) to… Continue reading

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June 13, 2011
by David Newman
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A Sea- and Sex-Change: The Story of Black Sea Bass in the South Atlantic

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York Here’s something you don’t hear about every day: a fish that catches itself.  Well, sort of.  The black sea bass lives in reefs, wrecks, and hard-bottom habitats of the Atlantic, whe… Continue reading

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June 7, 2011
by David Newman
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May They Snapper Back

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York DNA testing recently revealed that fish like tilapia are purposefully mislabeled and sold in grocery markets as pricier options like red snapper – as much as 77 to 90 percent of the time, accor… Continue reading

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April 21, 2011
by David Newman
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Let the Magnuson-Stevens Act Rebuild Fisheries

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York Last week, a noted fisheries scientist, Ray Hilborn, wrote an Op-Ed in the NY Times calling for the weakening of the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Act’s requirement to rebuild overfished species as quic… Continue reading

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April 18, 2011
by David Newman
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"Let Us Eat Fish," Now and Forever

David Newman, Oceans Program Attorney, New York Dr. Ray Hilborn, a veteran stock assessment scientist, published an Op-Ed in last week’s NY Times entitled “Let Us Eat Fish.”  The piece contains some misleading assertions and conc… Continue reading

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